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TOPIC: Antifouling

Antifouling 16 Dec 2018 12:41 #102939

  • Peter Cawson
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Balliol

Thanks for your valued suggestions

> You do not say where your yard is. If they are prepared to use it then to an extent that is fine, but in some areas you could technically be in breach of local regulations. I think somebody once said in a previous thread "hide the tin"!

The yard is Guido Willens, at Born, about 10 km south of Maasbracht on the Julianna canal - do you know them? I was put off by answers to my questions at another yard nearby and Guido seemed far more convincing. I'm not able to inspect the existing paint myself as the boat was lifted after I left for UK - Guido's photo attached. I don't know if this helps in your assessment. The yard reported that the antifouling is worn out. Hardly surprising as no repainting has been done since the boat's 2008 launch.

> The whole question of which anti-foul is very difficult: do you anti-foul well so that you do not transport invasive species such as zebra / quagga mussels around the world or from river to river, or do you use the "c**p" that is less likely to hurt the local environment? Is it better to use an anti-foul that lasts a number of years with controlled release, or one that needs re-coasting every year, with a fresh batch of eager toxins entering the ecosystem?

I'd not like to be responsible for spreading the presence of zebra mussels and presume that even commercial antifouling is not too harmful to the environment and probably less so that any paints that were commonly used 10 years ago. I'm inclined to go with the "hide the tin" thinking if it means it lasts years longer.

Most of the inside seems to be well painted and is always bone dry in the fore and aft sections. It's only the central engine room that always seems to have a few pints of oily water. I've searched high and low for the source without success but I've asked the yard to take a look when it's re-launched. I suspect it's drinking water rather than canal water. It looks messy but the paint is still good, so I don't think there's any internal corrosion.

Peter
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Antifouling 15 Dec 2018 09:56 #102929

Peter Cawson wrote: My boat is out of the water this winter as we need jobs done that require it out. These are mainly new antifouling and fresh anodes.

The yard has commented that the paint under the existing antifouling is poor - it appears to be a single coat of unspecified paint, but the steel is fine.

He says ideally sand blast, then re-paint then antifouling. Or it could be given a primer over the remains of the existing antifouling, then 2 coats of new antifouling. Black commercial International antifouling is suggested as he considers leisure International "utter c**p".

Do the experts here have any comments? I'm inclined to go for the latter (much less costly) solution and we review in 2 or 3 years' time when it next comes out of the water. Thanks

Peter


Peter,

Two points.

Firstly, you say the "steel is fine." If that means that the existing coating is "fine", i.e. that the film is intact and there is no corrosion, then you could leave well alone for the present and use the money that you save on grit blasting and re-coating the exterior on making sure that the boat is not corroding away from the inside, often a much bigger problem than external corrosion.

Secondly you mention "commercial" antifouling. Be aware that commercial anti-foulings are indeed better because they are more potent, since, subject to precise type, they variously contain enhancers such as certain biocides, or have a higher copper solids content, than yacht anti-foulings. In some waters, particularly inland, their use is banned on pleasure craft under 25 metres. You do not say where your yard is. If they are prepared to use it then to an extent that is fine, but in some areas you could technically be in breach of local regulations. I think somebody once said in a previous thread "hide the tin"!

The whole question of which anti-foul is very difficult: do you anti-foul well so that you do not transport invasive species such as zebra / quagga mussels around the world or from river to river, or do you use the "c**p" that is less likely to hurt the local environment? Is it better to use an anti-foul that lasts a number of years with controlled release, or one that needs re-coasting every year, with a fresh batch of eager toxins entering the ecosystem?

Balliol.

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Antifouling 13 Dec 2018 17:54 #102916

Can't say I'm an expert but I would go for the much less costly option. My own rule of thumb is that so long as there is some paint or antifouling or something on the steel then there is not too much to worry about. Personally I would pressure wash it then prime and paint or antifoul. Might be a bit chilly at the moment for the paint to cure though.

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Antifouling 13 Dec 2018 15:34 #102913

  • Peter Cawson
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My boat is out of the water this winter as we need jobs done that require it out. These are mainly new antifouling and fresh anodes.

The yard has commented that the paint under the existing antifouling is poor - it appears to be a single coat of unspecified paint, but the steel is fine.

He says ideally sand blast, then re-paint then antifouling. Or it could be given a primer over the remains of the existing antifouling, then 2 coats of new antifouling. Black commercial International antifouling is suggested as he considers leisure International "utter c**p".

Do the experts here have any comments? I'm inclined to go for the latter (much less costly) solution and we review in 2 or 3 years' time when it next comes out of the water. Thanks

Peter

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