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BARGES: All about barges and barging - building, buying, maintaining, equipment, handling on the water, etc.
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TOPIC: Electric anchor winch

Electric anchor winch 25 Oct 2019 23:48 #110918

The Fortress is a nice design. Very lightweight to carry in a bag. Wonderful on sandy bottoms but inefficient in case of weed. That's a good second anchor.
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Electric anchor winch 25 Oct 2019 21:34 #110917

The Fortress is aluminium I believe so it would need to be huge to have any significant weight and it's a dreadful design for storage. If you're anchoring in tidal estuaries then perhaps the Spade (or a much less costly Bruce) would perhaps be ideal, as both have no moving parts and perform very well in coastal tests. Pool or Halls have moving parts but seem to be designed to avoid the possibility of a jamb. I wouldn't trust a Britany not to jamb in stony ground.. Peter.
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Electric anchor winch 25 Oct 2019 20:51 #110916

I am also a big fan of Spade anchors, especially on tides turning. Never fails!

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Electric anchor winch 25 Oct 2019 20:42 #110915

  • Nick Baker
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Dear Peter, actually I sail coastal and estuaries so it is a concern. On my last boat (not a barge) I had a couple of instances where a Fortress anchor failed to re-set just due to stones or kelp jamming the pivot. But thanks anyhow - I shall certainly look at a Pool N as an option. Nick

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Electric anchor winch 25 Oct 2019 03:14 #110897

Nick. I shouldn't worry about tides turning in inland waterways! There are numerous comprehensive anchor tests for maritime use which prompted the first owner of my boat to choose a very efficient but somewhat unsatisfactory Spade as main anchor. Not my choice and probably better on a yacht on tidal waters where weight is the enemy. My previous boat (20m and 50 tons) had twin 60 Kg Pool N type (a bit OTT), although I never used these proper anchors. Larger vessels than ours require anchors of specified weights to meet regulations which tend to encourage the installation of less efficient solid iron lumps. I'm sure there are others here with much more anchor experience for the type of barge you have. Sorry I can't be more helpful.

Peter

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Electric anchor winch 24 Oct 2019 21:52 #110895

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Thank you, Peter. Looks very compact and a possible contender. I'm always a bit worried about pivoting (Danforth-type) anchors because of having to re-set with a turn of the tide. Any experience of this?
Nick

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Electric anchor winch 24 Oct 2019 16:31 #110889

Nick - Looking at images of windlasses, I think mine may be a Lofrans Cayman rather than a Kobra.

It seems that the Kobra has a smaller deck footprint but needs a large hole in the deck for its under-slung motor, whereas the Cayman seems to have its motor within its case so it can simply be bolted to the deck. This may be more suitable for a retro-fix installations. Much the same price.

Peter

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Electric anchor winch 24 Oct 2019 16:04 #110887

Modern "barge" anchors are normally Pool N type, which despite their very heavy appearance, have hollow flukes. Older Halls type anchors are indeed very heavy and nowhere near the holding power (per kg of anchor) as Pool. Also a Pool is less cumbersome to store than a Delta, so perhaps worth considering as an alternative.
www.dqmarine.com/pool-n-anchor.html

I have a Spade that wins most anchor efficiency tests but I really don't recommend it inland. It has a very sharp point that stabs into my bow when raised - I'd suggest you check this out when deciding on anchor type - a Delta may do the same.

I think my windlass is a Lofrans although I'm not sure. It works very well and takes its power from the bow thruster batteries. Works very well. I'd suggest you have its controls near the anchor rather than at the helm station, so the operator can see the angle of the chain as it's raised and the tags as it's lowered.

Peter

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Electric anchor winch 24 Oct 2019 12:57 #110880

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I am considering installing an electric anchor winch on my small sailing tjalke (18 tons disp). This is partly because I don't have a traditional anchor winch; its a converted leeboard winch and it is ineffective and lethal, and partly because, I'm getting old and decrepit! I am considering a Lofrans Kobra 1000 w with 10mm chain and a 20kg delta. Rather than use the existing hause pipe through the bow, I'm planning to use a bow roller emerging over the big fat strake around the bow (berghout - I think) through a hole in the boiesel, above deck level. This will give me better access to cat the anchor and allow me to use a delta rather than relying on the barge type anchors, which seem to have to be much heavier.

I'ld be very grateful for any comments before I spend an arm and a leg unwisely.

Nick Baker, Vr Alberdina2

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