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BARGES: All about barges and barging - building, buying, maintaining, equipment, handling on the water, etc.
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TOPIC: Waste Vegetable Oil (WVO) conversion barge

Waste Vegetable Oil (WVO) conversion barge 27 Oct 2019 10:56 #110949

Robert, you seem to have answered half of your queries. I would think it safe to assume Amsterdam plans to ban Diesel engines not diesel fuel, after all the inspector will see a Diesel engine and make a decision.
I suggest you contact the oil suppliers , you seem to know, and ask them to advise on the legality of the product , it's availability, and where and how it is delivered. They may have a data base of the engine types successfully using WVO.
I think it is safe to assume an insurance company would not accept an IBC as a flammable oil fuel tank, and if you plan to purchase a 20 meter plus barge ESTRIN may require steel tanks and pipe work and in an location seperate from the living area. Check the Knowledge base for the ESTRIN requirements.
You will also require fuel for the generator and probably the heating.
You may be barking up the wrong tree to save money. Many barges spend more on heating and also alcohol than propulsion fuel. Even when European beer is 25% of the Aussie price it all adds up, maybe look at at home brew or a still?

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Waste Vegetable Oil (WVO) conversion barge 26 Oct 2019 12:11 #110921

Hi Robert
I can't give you advice on legality.
I can make an observation, there are at least two continental haulage companies running parts of there
huge fleets on WVO,. I guess that they are sucking up the available supply.
I've never heard of a barge or other boat running on it In 11years of Europe cruising, even for winter heating.
Paul Hayes
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Waste Vegetable Oil (WVO) conversion barge 26 Oct 2019 03:23 #110920

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Thanks Peter - the main reason that I raised the question of excise and legality of WVO in Europe is that I need to find a reliable and authoritative source of information to base my decisions about whether to go down this path. At present, even the France and Germany information has come from blogs and other informal sources: not the calibre of evidence I would like to be offering to any EU water police as they dip my tanks! So if you could point me in the direction of any official or other trustworthy definitive information I would be most grateful.
A WVO conversion doesn't prevent the use of fossil fuel diesel - the key addition is a mechanism to heat the oil before it reaches the injectors. There is no "unconversion" required to revert to diesel. Your comment about availability and varied quality is true if you are trying to source free WVO from restaurants and the like. This is generally how I get my WVO in Australia and it works fine when you are in a fixed location and can develop local sources. The oil then requires filtering and 'dewatering' before use. Alternatively WVO can be purchased in bulk, prewashed, dried and filtered from WVO dealers. The oil comes with certification regarding a range of critical specifications such as pH, sulphur content, iodine value etc, so the quality is known and consistent. The commercial market for WVO in Europe has shrunk considerably in the past few years due to BSE and hence no livestock feed applications. However there are still WVO processors who supply biodiesel producers and I have found such suppliers in NL and Germany. If WVO were able to legitimately and economically replace diesel as a barge fuel, then the practice becoming widespread should improve the viability of the now struggling WVO industry in Europe.

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Waste Vegetable Oil (WVO) conversion barge 25 Oct 2019 14:07 #110909

> "Other than Germany, which seems to have the same excise for WVO as diesel, and France, where it is apparently “banned” as a fuel, I can find little information about the excise or legal status of WVO as a diesel replacement in Europe. "

Isn't that a killer before you start? If banned in France and of no financial benefit in Germany (not such a popular cruising country), you'd be limited to cruising in Belgium and Netherlands. Both these countries are very hot on non-duty-paid fuels, so you may have problems there too, either initially or in the future if WVO was to become more widely used in boats. At best you'd have an unsellable boat unless easily converted back to diesel.

How much WVO is currently available? It must surely be very limited and of very variable quality. Again, if others were to follow suit, there'd soon be a greater demand than supply and you could find yourself with an empty tank and no fresh supply to continue your cruising. Or am I being unduly pessimistic?

Peter


Peter

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Waste Vegetable Oil (WVO) conversion barge 25 Oct 2019 12:09 #110907

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Found the website, thanks - I'll email them. At up to 63 litres per hour, I'm not surprised they went WVO!!

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Waste Vegetable Oil (WVO) conversion barge 25 Oct 2019 11:59 #110905

Hi Robert,

I don't have specific information, but look for project 'Brupeg' on youtube. Its a couple converting a trawler in Australia, part of their plan is to run on waste vegetable oil and they have some videos talking about it. They have a large Cummins diesel engine.

Thanks,

Simon
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Waste Vegetable Oil (WVO) conversion barge 25 Oct 2019 08:36 #110901

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Correction to my post: 3rd paragraph, sentence starting "Other than Germany" should have gone on as follows "Other than Germany, which seems to have the same excise for WVO as diesel, and France, where it is apparently “banned” as a fuel, I can find little information about the excise or legal status of WVO as a diesel replacement in Europe. "

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Waste Vegetable Oil (WVO) conversion barge 25 Oct 2019 07:36 #110900

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Next year I am planning to embark on a long term cruising lifestyle aboard a yet-to-be purchased barge. Having had some historical success converting a couple of diesel Hilux Surfs (1Kz-te 3.0 litre diesel) to run on waste vegetable oil (WVO) I’m keen to pursue the idea of also running my future barge on WVO with resulting significant cost and environmental benefits. In Melbourne where I am living, I have not had a problem finding free WVO, but it is a time and space consuming rigmarole collecting, filtering, storing etc, especially dealing with 20 or 40 litres at a time from local small users. At the moment in Europe (I’m told largely thanks to BSE) it’s possible to get 1,000 litres of filtered WVO for $US200: ie US20c a litre! I’m hoping to be able to set up an IBC as a fuel tank on an easy coupling and crane the IBCs on and off the barge rather than have to pump 1,000 litres aboard on a refuel (and I won’t need a barge with 1,000+ litres of fuel tank).
I have no experience with WVO conversions in larger diesel engines. I have heard of a couple of Gardner 6LX WVO conversions in double decker buses in England and also of a Volvo Penta (marine) WVO conversion but I have no further details on either one. I haven’t stumbled across any barges in Europe or UK with a diesel WVO conversion. The main impediment to a WVO conversion is usually the injector pump: Bosch are alleged to be the most compatible with WVO and Diesel Kiki/Zexel and Nippon Denso pumps are mostly OK. Lucas, CAV and Delphi pumps are generally not recommended for use with WVO. Another ‘engine suitability’ factor is the proportion of unused fuel returned to the fuel tank: because the WVO has to be heated, without setting up a limited return line or a ‘day tank’, some diesels, eg GM Detroit (2 stroke) have too a high a return line ratio to readily heat the large volume of circulating fuel.
In Australia WVO is not classified as a fuel so there is no fuel excise to pay and it also avoids having to comply with fuel storage and handling regulations. Other than Germany While it will vary from batch to batch WVO particulate emissions can be expected to be about half that of fossil fuel diesel, and oxides of nitrogen levels will also be lower than diesel emissions. Sulphur content in WVO is likely to typically be 15 – 20 mg/kg but this can be further treated to achieve below 10 mg. As I understand, Amsterdam (and later possibly other European cities) will be phasing out the use of diesel for inland ‘pleasure’ vessels by 2025.
I welcome comment or suggestions on any of the above and in particular, I would like to hear from anyone who knows of a WVO powered barge or has had any experience with WVO as a diesel fuel replacement in Europe.
I understand that Gardners are generally fitted with Bosch injector pumps. I’m not familiar with DAF, Vetus and other European barge engines. Does anyone know which common diesel engines in barges use which brands of injector pump?
With the looming phasing out of diesel, does the current approach target diesel fuel per se or diesel engines? If it is specifically the fuel, WVO may offer an alternative, at least in the short term. How is this diesel ban likely to impact DBA members into the future given that almost all current barges are diesel powered?
I’m more than happy to share my (limited) knowledge and experience of WVO conversions if anyone is interested. I really would prefer to be pottering along smelling like fish and chips rather than smelling like a diesel truck so any help achieving that would be most appreciated.
regards, Bob

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