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TOPIC: 12v or 24v

12v or 24v 19 Apr 2020 07:22 #115355

Jan Pieterse wrote: 8 AWG ( 10 mm negative. ) versus 14 AWG. (1.5 mm)

Sorry Balliol, because of rewiring our first boat int he US. I got so engrained with AWG, even though I was educated in the metric system


Showing age, I still think (sometimes) in SWG - Standard Wire Gauge the UK Imperial System, not used in about 45 years 🤔🙂

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12v or 24v 19 Apr 2020 00:00 #115354

8 AWG ( 10 mm negative. ) versus 14 AWG. (1.5 mm)

Sorry Balliol, because of rewiring our first boat int he US. I got so engrained with AWG, even though I was educated in the metric system

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12v or 24v 18 Apr 2020 23:26 #115353

Hi Balliol

It certainly sounds that you have all bases covered, I would not have expected anything less 🙂.

As with so many things there are many good ways that work for individuals.

Combo's (intelligent) weren't an option when we fitting out, so went down the seperate charger / Inverter route. I think as a live aboard with a decent engineering background, I would still go the same way. Reliance on one Combi for power for 50 weeks of the year for years on end, knowing it will fail at sometime (as everything does) if used 24/7, just doesn't fit my thinking, however it can be perfect for others, who don't necessarily want to know how their vessel works. Electric equipment is getting more reliable all the time.

I am not fully conversant with the various combo's available, hence my suggestion of checking phase synchronisation, at to Htz.🙂 (Big thumbs, small keypad). These things are getting very sophisticated, perhaps driven by domestic solar power installations.

A lot depends on what is in existence when starting to (re) equip a vessel, and also budget available + type of use. Experience of the end user, DIY repairs or "yard" invoices preferred.

I was on a barge last year for a couple of weeks, running every day for long hours, spinning a 24v 150A alternator, with 8kW of combi, the Idea that the air conditioning and cooking could be run at the same time, which it could, even with a fairly large battery bank, the batteries took a belting, so in practice the 21kW generator was running about 5 hours a day.

I love your description of living by generator, and four ways of battery charging, it gives me (and I'm sure others) the excuse to say "ditto".🙂

I'm quite happy with Jabsco 24 volt water pumps, I changed one two weeks ago, for only the 3rd time in 15 years domestic use, the motors are all okay so a £40 overhaul kit and it's a usable spare again. We often find household showers very disappointing when in families houses🤔. A good size accumulator is I believe a good investment, about 20 liters or more, if possible.

We too are are all LED lighting, both 220 as 12, both can be used to produce different effects and moods. The salon and kitchen are very well lit as the 12v LEDs available 16 years ago were like glow worms compared to today's that we have replaced the originals with. In the morning we have to warn each other if putting on the cabin lights, by saying " protect your retina's 😃. If we want to be kind we just put a single reading light on.

It certainly looks like we will be on shore power for longer than hoped this year, so plenty of time to bat all sorts of ideas around.

I'm currently toying with the idea of an additional motive power source to supplement the main engine, or act as a stand alone secondary (less powerful say 30 - 40 h.p.) means of propulsion. Kicking ideas around, electric v hydraulic drive etc. As a (play) project it has to cost next to nothing, so will be a "junk yard challenge" if I get round to doing anything about it.

Paul

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12v or 24v 18 Apr 2020 21:56 #115351

  • Balliol Fowden
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Hi Paul,

You are absolutely right to warn about phase synchronisation (although at 50 hz in Europe) but take a look at the Victron site for Multi Plus and Quattro inverters. I think they have it covered. Don’t know about other makes! Personally I regard Victron as state of the art and when we need to upgrade our 20+ year old Mastervolt it will almost certainly be a Victron, or two if I can run to it.

I agree with your point about separate chargers and inverters rather than combis, but the Victron Multi is an impressive package with various advantages.

The question of redundancy and mains v. D.C. rather depends upon your setup. On Actief we have an extremely quiet and economical generator, which does not get used more than we have to but can run the whole ship if necessary. At New Year 1997 our boiler packed up but we ran the ship for three days with the generator running 24/7, with waste heat from the generator engine feeding the rads adequately, plus several fan heaters. None of the neighbours or even the ice skaters outside noticed! So if an inverter packs up and we have no shore power then the generator performs. That is better than many houses.

We have four means of charging batteries: main engine alternator, generator output via charger, a 24 volt alternator on the generator, plus shore power via charger If available. Obviously solar is an option as well for many. A second charger in parallel would still be an advantage. Our spare is still in its box but will get fitted in due course. That again is better than most houses.

So we are fairly well covered for mains and charging.

Water pumps: Yes, there is nothing worse than having tons of water on board but no way of getting it out of the tank. Ideally two pumps in parallel. Use both together, or one or other pump, alternating to keep both in the habit of working. Given various alternative 230 volt power sources I personally prefer mains pumps since they can be much more powerful for a given number of pounds, and the sort I would use are readily available in any local Brico, Gamma etc. As long as you avoid the very cheap plastic garden ones they last well and are usually quieter. Smaller yachty pumps are not built for residential service unless you spend a fortune (are Godwins still available?). Just seems to be more bang for your buck, and a much better shower!

For lighting there is really no argument any more. I would still fit a limited 24 volt lighting circuit for emergency use, or as mood lighting, but most of us use LED now and ELV led lamps are still silly expensive. We fitted 24 volt lighting on Actief 35 years ago when life was different, but have converted to bigger domestic sized light fittings in many cabins because the original 24 volt yachty fittings were too dim, and have to spend a fortune on LED bulbs. I would convert to 230v but the wiring is all single insulated so not really up to mains voltages. For a new project use 230 volt, because again you still have several potential power sources available, more than a house.

Fridges / freezers: We used to have a 24 volt Engel and a 230v Hotpoint or similar. The mains fridge was always the better one, so we now have two mains fridges. You have a better choice of units from Curry’s or the like. I would rather have a fridge that can be replaced from any local white goods store at painless cost, and you can have several alternative power sources, better than a house.

It’s the same argument for loos if we agree that we prefer something better than a Baby Blake. We actually have five different ones, (1) a compressed air one, (2) a 24 volt macerator, (3) a 230 volt macerator, (4) a domestic cistern wc with separate 230 v macerator and (5) a Porta Potts.

1 is great for guests, but does need a good mains supply for the compressor. 2 is rarely used because it can block, but not nearly as badly as the 12v one it replaced. 3 is again great, and works from the inverter perfectly happily. 4 is great, and everything can be replaced for minimal cost at the Brico, and 5 is there if we really need it. We hung on to our 4” Dutch pipe for a long time on the basis that it was absolutely fool proof, but finally conceded that it was a bit anti-social so yes, all the loos bar one depend upon power, but the mains ones are by far the best, and we do have three sources of..........

For most barges there are usually multiple options for mains or D.C. power, but as you will gather I would favour 230v AC for almost all appliances outside the engine room or bilge bar the shower drain pump, because it is usually more powerful, brighter, quieter, more reliable, easier to source or cheaper. I guess the other point is that in the modern world of marina moorings and power points you have to ask yourself how much of the time are you actually off grid?? Much of the time most of your boat can function directly from the mains without involving inverters and batteries.

Balliol..

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12v or 24v 18 Apr 2020 20:24 #115350

Just a couple of thoughts:

1) A few replies have suggested using two combi inverter / chargers. These are very intelligent bits of kit, whatever the make, but are they intelligent enough to "Phase sync" with each other, e.g. the sine wave of the A.C. produced by one inverter when NOT on shore supply has an oscillating sine wave of 60 times a second (Europe), A.C. equipment must have this frequency to work. If a second inverter does not "Phase sync" at exactly the same frequency and timing as the first. then the A.C. equipment will be receiving two peak voltages (110V either side of neutral) at slightly different times. This could cause damage to equipment. Not a good thing.
When connected TO the shore supply the inverters "Phase sync" to the shore supply so both will sync to the sane wave form. A good thing.
Before installing two inverters (or more) to ONE supply 220V A.C. distribution board, check that they will supply synchronised phase wave.
patterns.
If they will not, then by all means install two (or more inverters, however, each should supply different distribution boards, e.g. Forward Accommodation,or Stern Accommodation, or, for instance, No. 1. Board - Water pump, washing machine, forward TV, Forward sockets. No. 2 Board - Tumble dryer, dish washer, immersion heater.

As live aboard I prefer a alternate way of managing A.C. electricity.
Two separate 24 volt battery chargers, three outlets each (Sterling Power Products) separately manually switched charging the 24 volt systems, i.e. House batteries, Engine start and Thruster batteries.
One 24 V to 12 v battery charger, fed from the engine start battery charging the 12v generator start , lighting and instrument batteries.

Two separate low wattage sine wave inverters, one feeding forward to run fridge, 220v lights, freezer, TV, and domestic boiler. via No. 1. Distribution Board.
The other No. 2 D.B. serving rear accommodation, hairdryer, air bath compressor and sockets, 22v lights

This way I have total redundancy, if one charger, or Inverter fails (as they do after several years or more) I can still live with 220v A.C

Each A.C distribution Board has a manual 3 way Generator / Shore / Inverter switch. I have control. of source and distribution. This system is well found, simple and manageable, has redundancy built in, and served me well for 15 years. I have replaced combi's for others when the first thing they know that the thing has "died" is when there is no water to flush the loo in the middle of the night.

Two things that are a must have on, a boat are water, and toilet,

For toilets, water pump I like 24v D.C, and two of each, again for redundancy, spares are cheap enough to keep a goodly supply on board.

For what it's worth everyone has his favorite way of doing things, I know all electric ships that run the generator every time they cook, and others with virtually no electrical equipment, using oil lamps and gas cookers and fridges.

The maim thing to do is have all electrical systems, both A.C, and D.C. installed safely by a competent person.

A good book to help you understand electrical systems on board is:

Boat Owner's Wiring Manual, by Charles Wing ISBM 0713640723

Paul Hayes

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12v or 24v 18 Apr 2020 18:15 #115347

I do much the same as Jan, running a large -ve cable to each area with equipment - but I run each cable back to a main -ve busbar rather than branching - but the layout of the boat might make that a good idea, subject to Balliol's point about connections. Like others, most of my equipment is either 230V domestic or 24V 'marine' stuff like pumps and heads, with a 24-12 dropper for the instruments.

The 'new' (1922) barge I am refiffing appeared to be all 12V (with no 230V at all) with a pair of 12V batteries. Digging deeper, I found the starter motor to be 24V and the alternator 12V :ohmy: I would have converted it to 24V with droppers to the 12V systems - except that I already had a new 12V Multiplus and toilet ready to install! So, it willl wind up with 24V for the engine 12V for the loo, lighting and instrumentation and 230V for the domestics.

Pete

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12v or 24v 18 Apr 2020 17:40 #115346

  • Balliol Fowden
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The down side to this plan might be how you have connected your junction boxes. If the main DC return is split at every junction box or spur then you have more risk of resistance building up in terminations, but that would only be if the terminals were poorly made / unprotected, which I am sure they are not. If your return is 5 times the cross section of five feeds then I guess diversity would step in to help.

Balliol.

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12v or 24v 18 Apr 2020 16:05 #115341

Ok here is another question regarding the DC circuits.

I have my DC equipment split up in a few groups
DC fans. ( so they can stay on 365 )
Cruising equipment Circuit
Living equipment Circuit

That way I can just flip the breakers when the situation changes from on shore, to cruising to away

Now what I have done is one main DC negative line for each circuit and branched off to the equipment.
The DC + goes from breaker to switch to each piece of equipment

This way I have a nice big sized negative DC line(s) and normal sized positive lines
The negative DC lines are sized to all equipment being on, thus expecting a lower voltage drop. having less cable runs.

Anybody thoughts about this.

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12v or 24v 18 Apr 2020 14:22 #115337

Regarding engine start, I guess you have a large heavy lump of an engine so 24V probably best. My engine is just 4.2 l and is started (with 100% reliability even after a winter lay-up) with a single little 12V 50 Ah battery. I changed it recently (moved to start the generator now) after 10 year of pretty heavy cruising. We do between 16 and 22 weeks of cruising and turn off the engine at nearly every lock - 511 last year. Battery is Optima Red Top - brilliant! The only original 2008 battery still in use. Get 2 if starting with 24V.

Peter

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12v or 24v 18 Apr 2020 14:12 #115336

  • Balliol Fowden
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Sorry, numbered the options wrongly. Edited below:

Balliol Fowden wrote: Charlie's scenario is very similar to ours on "Actief.". Relatively (and intentionally) modest domestic battery capacity( for the same reasons as Charlie's), super-silent generator, generous 230v AC socket circuit, 24/12 dropper for wheelhouse gear, and effectively no 12 /24 DC socket circuit (since they are never used now). We cruise 5 or 6 weeks a year, otherwise we are on shore power. No solar since there is no spare area on deck to site panels.

So what do we do about all those little devices that need charging or powering, often over night?

We often find ourselves with up to ten persons on board when cruising, but the average might be four adults, 3 grandsons, thus say 4 phones, 6 tablets, miscellaneous other small devices to charge via USB etc., nightlights for the kids and so on. Plus 2 mains fridges, and we might have three or 4 bug zappers on the go all night. So when off the mains and when the generator is not running the inverter is permanently churning away. We virtually never bother plugging into shore mains if we are off our mooring since our overall demand can be too high for the average shore socket.

The whole setup works fine even in the hottest of weather so for Actief it is a hypothetical situation, but perhaps interesting for others if their usage is similar. The possibilities for a new installation would seem to be :

1. Use 12 or 24 volts to supply all ELV (5/12/24 volt appliances), via multiple droppers as appropriate.

2. Use 230 volt from the main inverter.

The simple question for those who like crunching numbers is which is the more efficient use of whatever ampere hours we have? Ignore charging aspects: quite simply what is the more efficient way of using the ampere hours that we have in our house batteries?

Option (1) would involve an assessment of the extra resistive loses from ELV power transfer. 24 volt will be more efficient than 12 volt, but then 24/12 droppers are relatively inefficient (look at the heat sinks!) and 24 v DC is rarely needed or convenient, so as Jan suggests plenty of little droppers to 12 volt or USB.

Option (2 ) would seem to involve an assessment of the efficiency of a modern good quality inverter running more or less constantly, and the power losses through multiple normal small 230/ELV charging plugs, USB sockets etc

I am tempted to stray onto the 12/24v DC OR 230v AC aspect, also "reliability and redundancy", but perhaps those separate subjects are best left to separate threads. Anybody want to start one?

Balliol.

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12v or 24v 18 Apr 2020 11:07 #115330

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Charlie's scenario is very similar to ours on "Actief.". Relatively (and intentionally) modest domestic battery capacity( for the same reasons as Charlie's), super-silent generator, generous 230v AC socket circuit, 24/12 dropper for wheelhouse gear, and effectively no 12 /24 DC socket circuit (since they are never used now). We cruise 5 or 6 weeks a year, otherwise we are on shore power. No solar since there is no spare area on deck to site panels.

So what do we do about all those little devices that need charging or powering, often over night?

We often find ourselves with up to ten on board when cruising, but the average might be four adults, 3 grandsons, thus say 4 phones, 6 tablets, miscellaneous other small devices to charge via USB etc., nightlights for the kids and so on. Plus 2 mains fridges, and we might have three or 4 bug zappers on the go all night. So when off the mains and when the generator is not running the inverter is permanently churning away. We virtually never bother plugging into shore mains if we are off our mooring since our overall demand can be too high for the average shore socket.

The whole setup works fine even in the hottest of weather so for Actief it is a hypothetical situation, but perhaps interesting for others if their usage is similar. The possibilities for a new installation would seem to be :

1. Use 12 or 24 volts to supply all ELV (5/12/24 volt appliances), via multiple droppers as appropriate.

2. Use 230 volt from the main inverter.

The simple question for those who like crunching numbers is which is the more efficient use of whatever ampere hours we have? Ignore charging aspects: quite simply what is the more efficient way of using the ampere hours that we have in our house batteries?

Option (1) would seem to involve an assessment of the efficiency of a modern good quality inverter running more or less constantly, and the power losses through multiple small 230/ELV charging plugs, USB sockets etc.

Option (2) would involve an assessment of the extra resistive loses from ELV power transfer. 24 volt will be more efficient than 12 volt, but then 24/12 droppers are relatively inefficient (look at the heat sinks!) and 24 v DC is rarely needed or convenient, so as Jan suggests plenty of little droppers to 12 volt or USB.

I am tempted to stray onto the 12/24v DC OR 230v AC aspect, also "reliability and redundancy", but perhaps those separate subjects are best left to separate threads. Anybody want to start one?

Balliol.

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12v or 24v 18 Apr 2020 09:49 #115325

  • Charles Mclaren
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We converted viod from trade, and live aboard on a permanent mooring in London and cruise the Thames and east coast 4 weeks a year. We have a large 3 phase genny and a small single phase both fitted when we bought her.
So Cruising: I start the engine say thirty times a year...the other 11 months the 24v batteries just sit. So I use a small 12amp victron multistage charger to maintain them. The 120 amp alternator on the engine Just charges the 24v (2x12v) domestic batteries when we are cruising. During the year the victron multi-plus looks after these two and powers the ship when cruising. Batteries are expensive so I keep the number to a minimum. The downside of this is I use the generator a lot when I cruise, but it is quiet and the cost of diesel is far less than replacing batteries. I have no low voltage around the barge and any 12v instruments are run on a 24>12v reducer.
For me having shorepower 11months a year this works. I would have a different system if I lived off grid. Charlie

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12v or 24v 18 Apr 2020 08:38 #115324

I use variations of these converters - 4https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/5A-DC-to-DC-Step-Down-Buck-Converter-Constant-Voltage-or-Current-5-32V-UK/163076870477?hash=item25f823914d:m:mUz7rxf9P8ZdmzcI1D3yF3g

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Colin Stone
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DBA - The Barge Association
DBA - De Binnenvaartvereniging
DBA - L’Association des Péniches de Plaisance

12v or 24v 18 Apr 2020 06:16 #115323

Oh just a comment on Peter's posting

our barge was originally 12V, thus the engine had a 12V start, and I was not in the mood to swap that one out.
At first I thought of one DC-DC converter for all 12V systems, instruments, ais , radio etc. But I really fell in love with the 5 amp ( 60 watt) Dc-Dc from victron , really small and by giving each piece of equipment their own dc-dc converter I could afford 2 spares. they are around 15E or so a piece

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12v or 24v 18 Apr 2020 00:37 #115322

Our setup is similar to Jans with the exception of 24 v starting. So a 40 amp alternator to charge the 24v starting battery bank, a 90 amp alternator to charge the 24v house bank which provides power to the Victron Quatro and DC-DC converter for the instruments / radios, AIS and Blue Board.
Ben, it's fairly complicated but not impossible to build. The devil is in the design and the detail. I had mine done by a specialist marine electrical installer. Look for someone doing tugs or ferry's rather than small pleasure boats. If the backbone is in the vessel at the start it's easy to add on, and if you don't use a feature then turn it off. It's a bugger if down the track you need to run extra cables and fit extra circuit breakers in confined spaces.

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12v or 24v 17 Apr 2020 16:57 #115316

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I follow Jan all the way (for once)

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res non verba,
Tx for the beer :-)

12v or 24v 17 Apr 2020 14:17 #115312

One thing to remember......at least when I looked.....24 V based Victron inverters were cheaper than 12 V

we have 2 * 3000 Multiplus

I have a 12V engine, 24 V/220V barge.
and as Balliol stated Whale Gulper for shower etc.
As Colin stated domestic stuff is all 220V

Now here is where I differ from most....all 12 V equipment, VHF, Internet router, I have hooked to the 24V battery bank with the use of a small Victron DC-DC converter. just mounted at the equipment, they are really cheap, That way all my breakers are 24V and I have less DC drop.

The 12V is only used for the engine. And yes I have a nice size 24V alternator also hooked on the engine.

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12v or 24v 17 Apr 2020 12:58 #115311

I have a slightly different view. All our essentials are 24v DC - bilge pumps, water pump, fridge, custom underfloor chest freezer, overhead lighting and macerator toilet.
Domestic stuff - CH Boiler, TV, Oven, HiFi, table lamps etc is AC.
It is probably historical but an inverter even with no load is still chomping away at 24Ah/600Wh plus each day doing nothing.
Plus, an earth wire came adrift sufficiently for the main AC RCD to nuisance trip all the time. Took 36 hours to find it. So 36 hours without AC??And how long if one needs an electrician to come to the back of beyond??
2 x Victron MultiPlus 3000/70/24 inverters are mounted pretty close to domestic battery with fat cables - 2 x 70mm for + and -.

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Colin Stone
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DBA - De Binnenvaartvereniging
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12v or 24v 17 Apr 2020 11:49 #115308

Hi Ben

Also consider splitting your domestic battery banks to the Victron inverter (they often take two inputs, roughly 100A per input possible at 12-24V). So 5000Watts = 2 X 24V X 100+A inputs.

our bank is not split (odd number batteries) and it halves the rated output so falling over pretty common when we forget to ration the power to the kitchen machines. Much WAF ensues.

Cheers
Chris

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12v or 24v 17 Apr 2020 11:25 #115304

Ben
As usual Baliol has gotit right. the only thing to add is to make sure that the inverter is located as close as possible to your domestic battery bank. I didn't and our inverter sometimes cuts out when we have a high starting serge (vacuum cleaner etc ) caused by voltage drop in the supply cables.

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12v or 24v 17 Apr 2020 11:11 #115302

  • Balliol Fowden
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Is this "fastest finger first"? Just shows how much spare time we all have at the moment!!

I agree that 24V for the engine might be simpler and better overall but Ben has the 12 volt system and a change to 24 volt involves rather more than just changing the starter and alternator.

Balliol.

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12v or 24v 17 Apr 2020 11:02 #115301

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Ben,

My opinions:

1. Engine. If your engine is basically 12 volt (starter & alternator) I would stick to 12V for that, with a dedicated starter battery, and that circuit should also supply all navigation instruments, navigation lights, bilge pumps etc. through a suitable dedicated distribution board.

2. Since modern inverters are so efficient I would be inclined to use 230 volt AC from an inverter (with auto shore power/generator changeover) to power most domestic circuits. 230 volt fridges are better and much cheaper than DC ones. Domestic water pressure pumps etc. are generally better sourced as 230 volt units from the likes of Machine Mart or Clarke rather than buying little yachty units. Macerator toilets are better on 230 volt and again usually cheaper. Most lighting could be 230 volt LED which greatly widens your choice of light fittings of suitable size for barges and again reduces costs.

3. I would use 24 volts for the remaining DC domestic circuits, which should include limited DC emergency lighting. 24V Whale Gulper type pumps are probably still best for showers etc. Your existing "12 volt" loom should be suitable for 24 volt and you will suffer less voltage drop, but do not be tempted to use any part of it for 230 volt..

4. In the old days we tended to fit 12V & 24V sockets for various things but really there is very little case for these now. I have removed most of mine.. 230V AC covers most things more easily.

5. You will need an additional 24 volt alternator on your main engine, which shouldn't be a problem to fit but it needs doing properly.

6. You will need a good 24 volt battery bank to supply your inverter and the (limited) 24 volt DC domestic circuit. Opinions will differ greatly on the capacity that you need.

7. An inverter such as a Victron Multi or Quattro 24 volt will deal with 24 Volt and 12 volt battery charging and will switch changeovers between shore / generator / inverter. Subject to demands I would fit two smaller units in parallel rather than one larger unit so you have some redundancy.

24 volt DC circuits are in effect no different to 12 volt excepting that the spark if you short is rather bigger. 24 volt will be more efficient in terms of voltage drops.

You then need to work out how you set out your 230 v AC systems.

Balliol.

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12v or 24v 17 Apr 2020 10:50 #115300

I think the answer is probably both, Ben. Admittedly most barges have 24v because of engine systems, in particular charging.
If you plan to cruise you will get bigger output alternators on 24v. Equally wiring, for something like a 5KVA Victron Quattro, which would probably represent the heart of the electrical system, would be massively bulky at 12v.
If you don't plan to cruise and you have a strong shore-power supply then you wouldn't need a Victron right now, but it would be a mistake not to provide a wiring and space layout to fit one later, if you wish not to harm the boat's value.
As it is barges with 24v core systems always have a 12v sub-system for electronics. I would consider changing the engine over to 24v, which is far better suited to cold starting a diesel of that size, I'm sure 24v parts to fit are plentiful and cheap.
Your 12v wiring harness is voltage agnostic, and in fact would be far less stressed at 24v. If it's just really for lighting then LED's aren't drawing much anyway.
The key thing is to have mains everywhere on the boat. Appliances for mains are far better all round, so that should be the goal, which in turn demands something like a Victron Quattro to manage the loads and power sources.

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12v or 24v 17 Apr 2020 10:49 #115299

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Neither. Consider just 240v. All the gear is far cheaper as it is all domestic off the shelf. Invertor/chargers are not too expensive now. C

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12v or 24v 17 Apr 2020 10:14 #115297

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12v or 24v?
I’m at a crossroads with my Barge build, a lot of people have told me 24v is best for this and that and even economy and quality of appliances etc etc. I would probably prefer to keep the barge simple in its systems and I can get my head around 12v a lot more than 24 for some reason..
It’s already got a brand new 12v wiring loom throughout the boat that I would be daft to not use, would I de-value the boat by sticking to 12v only?
(Ford dover engine, 12v starter motor)
Thanks in advance
Ben
(65x13 luxemotor)

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